Whispers of the Sunrise

Naziyah Mahmood

salah

Deepest slumbers, gently nudged, by the softest voices of my travelling conscience;
“Awaken, my sweet, come to prayer, come to salvation”
The words rolling through the skies, over the hills of atonement.

Fading moon, rising sun, light kisses on their mutual passage through time;
“Cleanse your soul, illuminate your being, I am waiting”
A gap in the dawn, veiled by the radiance of His Majesty and Grace.

Silent struggle, standing tall, ascending towards self purification;
“Spiritual cleansing, physical ablution, absolved from worldly bounds”
An incandescent aura, emanating from every limb and every motion.

Open soul, intimate words, a liberation through prostration;
“Free yourself, share your tears, I am here”
An elevated state, reached through the humbling gestures of adoration.

Rising up, heart content, facing the day with a reinforced hope;
“I am with you, I have always been with you, and always will be”
Sweet whispers of the sunrise that…

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Why learn algorithms and data structures ?

Vishwanath Krishnamurthi's blog

The question is – Why learn algorithms and data-structures ? 

and here are some thoughts. Probably you’d find this question answered in the preface of any algorithms book but anyway, here’s my take.

1) To not be constrained by the programming language for data-structure

Without a good knowledge of various data structures, it is easy to be constrained to thinking for solutions in terms of the data structures directly provided by the language.

If you were a Java programmer, you’d probably be thinking on solutions just in terms of what is provided in java.lang.util package.

Well, there’s lots more. Take for instance a simple need:  In a low end, basic phone, as the user types something, you’d like to present the user with “auto complete” feature. Thinking in terms of the data structures readily provided by the language /libraries doesn’t help much.

A simple trie  would help here. For another example, to think of any…

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Eclipse Driver

Diver is a dynamic analysis tool for Java that integrates scalable sequence diagram views with an interactive trace-focused UI in Eclipse. It provides sophisticated debugging support for understanding and exploring features of interest. Through a series of plugins for Eclipse, Diver allows you to: – easily record and capture traces of your runni…

https://eclipsediver.wordpress.com/download/

https://github.com/thechiselgroup/Diver

Using Repository Creation Utility (RCU)

Siva's Blog

This post is in continuation to the previous post that talked out the OSB installation and setup of Dev environment in Eclipse IDE. In this post, we will see the database dependency of OSB.

Much of the functionality provided with Oracle Service Bus (OSB) does not have any database dependency. Refer to the oracle blog post here that talks about the same. But there are 2 reasons why we need to look into database as well:

  • OSB Reporting functionality which is provided as one of the service monitoring features, needs database tables to store reporting data. By default, derby internal database is used for this purpose or we can configure to use any other schema during WLS domain creation.
  • And one of the major features included in OSB11g is integration with the Oracle Web Services Manager (OWSM). OWSM provides policy based security solution to secure the proxy services. These out…

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Repository Creation Utility (RCU) 11.1.1.6.0 Installation On Windows OS

Oracle Fusion Middleware

The RCU creates all the needed schemas required by the SOA Suite.
You can find RCU 11.1.1.6.0 installation here:
http://download.oracle.com/otn/nt/middleware/11g/111160/ofm_rcu_win_11.1.1.6.0_disk1_1of1.zip

More information about the RCU and schmeas creation:
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/doc.1111/e14259/rcu.htm#BABIDIBC

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Number Sense Craftivity

Relief Teaching Ideas

– Students trace their hands, cut out & glue down onto A3 paper, except for the fingers!

They can then make sums to 10 by folding the fingers down & counting, and recording the sums underneath.

20140218-155730.jpg
Older students can use this craft to learn the 9 times table finger trick!

Fold down the finger that you are multiplying 9 by (e.g. For 6×9 you would fold down the 6th finger). Count how many fingers are to the left of that folded down finger (5) & how many are to the right of that finger (4). That is your answer! 6 x 9 = 54!

20140218-155846.jpg

I originally saw this idea on this page: http://kindergartendoodles.blogspot.com.au/2012/05/building-number-sense.html?m=1 but I didn’t have a cricut machine to make the hands.

Instead the kids trace their own hands to work with. I also decided to get them to record their sums underneath as a way to consolidate…

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